Latin NCAP latest results: Nissan impacts with four and five stars while Aveo reaches zero stars
12.12.2017

Latin NCAP’s eighth and last round of results for 2017 was released today with encouraging results for the Nissan Murano and the Nissan Kicks and even with improvements, another zero star performance for one of the best selling cars in Mexico, the Chevrolet Aveo. In our latest testing, the Murano for the Latin American market, offered clear improvements in adult safety performance comparing it to the test from one year ago. The recently launched Nissan Kicks managed to get four stars for adult occupant protection. The Chevrolet Aveo, showed progress adding two airbags, three point seatbelts in all positions and ISOFIX anchorages as standard but the test still showed that there is a high probability of life threatening injuries.

The Nissan Murano produced in the United States, achieved five stars for Adult Occupant Protection and three stars for Child Occupant Protection. The Murano was tested in 2016 by Latin NCAP reaching only two stars in Adult Occupant Protection and four stars in Child Occupant Protection. At that time Nissan committed to improve the Murano’s performance in the frontal and pole side impact tests. In the latest Latin NCAP tests the Murano (as from production date October 6th 2017) showed good frontal and pole impact performance. The structure in the frontal crash was improved and was rated as stable, showing better dummy and dimensional values than in the previous tests (2016). In the pole impact Nissan improved the model allowing the curtain airbag to properly deploy and granting top safety performance for adults. The difference in results from four to three stars in the Child Occupant Protection is explained by the small variation in the child occupant dynamic test probably due to the change in structural performance in the frontal crash test. The Murano offers 7 airbags and Electronic Stability Control (ESC) as standard equipment.

The Nissan Kicks achieved four stars for Adult Occupant Protection and four stars for Child Occupant Protection. The recently lunched compact SUV from Nissan, with two airbags as standard equipment, showed a just unstable structural and footwell area performance in the frontal crash test that explains the weak chest protection while in the side impact protection it showed adequate to good protection being enough in the overall results for four stars in Adult Occupant Protection. The Kicks offers ESC that meets Latin NCAP requirements in performance and availability. The child occupants received good protection in the front and side impact as both Child Restraint System (CRS) were installed with ISOFIX anchorages and the vehicle showed to be properly prepared for it. Considering the performance and added to the availability of 3-point belts in all seating positions, lack of passenger airbag disconnection switch and ISOFIX marking not meeting Latin NCAP requirements, explain the four stars in Child Occupant Protection.

The Chevrolet Aveo, now updated to two airbags standard, produced in Mexico, was tested in the frontal and side impact under the latest Latin NCAP tests, achieving zero stars for Adult Occupant Protection and three stars for Child Occupant Protection. The non-airbag version of this model was tested in 2015 and achieved zero stars for adult occupants. In the latest frontal impact test the Aveo recorded poor protection to the chest of the driver even with airbags. The structural performance was rated as unstable which explains also the movement of the steering column and pedals increasing the risk of injuries in the driver. The Side impact protection offered by the Aveo for the adult occupants is adequate to good as it has good energy absortion features. The Child Occupant Protection showed improvements from the 2015 model when CRS were installed using seatbelts, and in 2017 test the CRS used were installed using the ISOFIX anchorages and top tether. The protection offered for the child occupants in the front and side impact was good getting full points in the dynamic test; this performance compared to the 2015 test is explained by the use of ISOFIX anchorages and the unstable structural performance in the frontal crash that reduced the energy to the second row of seats. The point’s reduction came from the lack of ISOFIX marking according to Latin NCAP requirements, lack of passenger airbag disabling switch, limited instructions and failure of some CRS to properly be installed in the car.

Alejandro Furas, Secretary General of Latin NCAP said:

“It is encouraging to see Nissan’s improvements in the Murano to move it to a five star level for adults as well as the safety levels of the Kicks. Latin NCAP showed once again that just adding airbags will not make a car safe when the structure is unstable. We call for GM to bring the same safety levels offered as standard by them in other markets to Latin America very soon. These three results show once again the relevance and benefits of testing all models available in the market, bringing global minimum safety levels as standard for all Latin Americans earlier than governmental regulations. Early safer cars save time that is translated into saving lives. The market is reacting earlier and beyond governmental requirements thanks to Latin NCAPs tests. Latin NCAP is calling for all governments in Latin America to urgently adopt both the UN’s front and side impact crash test standards certification, Electronic Stability Control (ESC) and Pedestrian Protection requirements. In the meantime, to make Latin NCAP tests mandatory for all cars in the market, which will allow all consumers to have clear information on the safety offered by the car that they plan to buy. Consumers from Latin America and the Caribbean should not pay more for basic global safety offered in mature economies”.

Ricardo Morales Rubio, Latin NCAP Chairman of the Board of Directors said:

“Close to the end of 2017 we have been seeing a good reaction from car manufacturers in Latin NCAP crash tests. The improvements of the models already in the market is a reaction to showing our results and the improvements are coming earlier and above any governmental expected regulations even if they are still not planned. The New models with good results are the result of a good planning well in advance for a good safety level at very early stages of the vehicle development”.

Nissan Murano

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Nissan Kicks

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Chevrolet Aveo

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About Latin NCAP

The Latin New Car Assessment Programme, Latin NCAP, was launched in 2010 to develop a regional system of independent crashworthiness and safety rating across Latin America and Caribbean (LAC). Latin NCAP replicates similar consumer testing programmes developed over the last thirty years in North America, Europe, Asia and Australia, and which have proved to be very effective in improving the safety of motor vehicles. Since 2010 Latin NCAP has published the results of more than eighty cars in eight test phases.

Latin NCAP acknowledges the support received by the Global New Car Assessment Programme (Global NCAP), International Consumer Research and Testing (ICRT), FIA Foundation, the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) and Bloomberg Philanthropies Global Road Safety Initiative.

Latin NCAP is an Associate member of Global NCAPand supports the United Nations Decade of Action for Road Safety 2011-2020 and the Stop the CrashPartnership.

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